Jack v Sarcoma Ironman Blog – Week 15 (20/05/19 – 26/05/19)

Monday – REST

Tuesday – 1:00 Swim, 1:00 Run (Z2) with 4 x 2min Z4 sprints @ 1min

The swim distance has ramped up to about 2.5km’s per session, and I’ve also introduced a third session per week. I think if I’m going to actually do alright in one of the components then it’ll be the swim. I’ve also added some intervals mid-run to start to build my anaerobic capacity and to try and better control my heartrate.

I didn’t eat enough during the day and mid-swim/throughout the run I wasn’t in a great state. Packed a Gatorade which saved me.

Wednesday – 0:45 Bike into 0:30 Run (Z2)

Completed the components of the bike over a few sessions. Going to the gym for boxing, to and from work. Finally managed to borrow an old pair of bib knicks and a jersey. It looks so bad. Also took a tumble as I emerged from the car park before the ride to the gym. Some tradies in traffic behind me loved it.

Thursday – 1:00 Swim, 1:15 Bike (100rpm+) (Z1)

The swim felt good. Have locked in a swim analysis session on Sunday which should really get my technique fully up to scratch. Cycling is going well, loving being outdoors rather than inside on the indoor trainer

Friday – 1:00 Swim, 1:00 Run (Z2)

Visited an exercise physiologist out at Olympic Park to get some ideas on how I was tracking with strength and conditioning. Key items to come out of the visit were:

  • Flexibility is not good
  • My right leg is significantly weaker than my left
  • ‘Trunk’ needs work

He’s sent through a strength and mobility program to incorporate into the training twice a week. Fingers crossed my right ass can improve over the coming months.

Saturday – 1:30 Run (Z1 – Z2)

Felt good despite playing some extremely bad golf in the morning.

Sunday – 1:00 Technique Swim, 2:00 Cycle (Z2)

Rode to and from the swim session with the coach (Adam). It was fantastic and I came away with lots of different things to work on in the coming month’s training (breathing earlier, catching the water higher than I am currently). I’ll certainly head back for a refresh in 4-5 weeks time.

Came off the bike again on the way back from the swimming lesson out at Auburn. It was bleeding everywhere but a lovely lady in a car next to where I fell offered me her Dettol wipes and large band-aids which she seemingly keeps in the car for these extraordinarily unique occasions.

 

This week was a really good one exercise-wise. Started slow and sluggish but finished strong. These consultations with the physiologist and swimming coach will make a huge difference in the long run too. Monday will represent 26 weeks til game day.

As always, if you have any suggestions or ideas to help raise awareness for sarcoma research and/or the work CRBF do, please shoot me a message on social media or via email (jack.racklyeft@gmail.com). Please share this, or any information from my donation page below to anyone and everyone you can. I have no doubt that slowly but surely, we will start to raise awareness and to make a truly positive change:

https://donorbox.org/jack-s-ironman-for-sarcoma

City2Surf 2019

With a month to go, the Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation City to Surf team will once more spill onto William St, making their way onto New South Head Road, on the 14 km road to ‘Cure Sarcoma’.  

Register before 24th July and receive a $10 discount! It’s a two step process:

1. Register for the City2Surf 2019

Register for City2Surf 2019 at https://city2surf.com.au/

  • Join the TEAM “Coops Sprint for Sarcoma” as you register
  • Do NOT select a charity partner as you register for the event

2. Create a Fund-Raiser Page to Raise Funds for Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation

Go to https://city2surf2019.everydayhero.com/au/get-started

  1. Enter Your Page Title
  2. From the list of Charities select “Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation” – VERY IMPORTANT!!!
  3. Enter the remainder of details for the page
  4. Create Your Page
  5. Once page created select button on right to “Join an existing team”
  6. Search for Coops Sprint for Sarcoma
  7. Select “Join this Team”

Share your page with all friends and family through social media and email, and ask them to help us continue Cooper’s legacy to raise money for sarcoma research!

Week 2

Monday – REST

Tuesday – 1:00 Swim, 1:00 Run (Z2)

These sessions seem to be going quite well. The swimming stroke is getting more efficient with each passing session and the runs are probably my favourite training efforts at this stage.

Wednesday – 0:45 Bike into 0:30 Run (Z2)
Today was my first time ever riding with cleats, and first outdoors training cycle of the campaign. I was warned about the difficulties of twisting out of the cleats to stop and balance myself and as such, completed about 15 minutes of practice in our downstairs garage area before venturing out into the real world. I felt like an 8 year old learning to ride again and hit the deck at about the same rate. I assume this is what all professionals do regularly.

As part of a CRBF challenge, I sent out the challenge for supporters to bump the fundraising total up from $6.2k to $6.5k in a couple of hours. In exchange for this, I’d shave my hair into a Mohawk and sport it during the whole of Anzac Day. $300 worth of donations later and I looked maybe as
unattractive as I ever have in my life (and that’s saying something). Thank you once again for all your tremendous support! Keep telling your friends and family about the amazing cause!

Thursday – 1:00 Swim, 1:15 Bike (100rpm+) (Z1)
The swim was boring but relaxing. Completed this cycle indoors after the trials and tribulations of the inaugural outdoors cycle yesterday, but also because the Manchester Derby was on and I had to watch. Time flew by with that on… 2 – 0 to Man City. I’m pretty sure Bernardo Silva is not of this
world but I will continue to investigate.

Friday – 1:00 Run (Z2)
This was my first run with a shaved head following the success of the donations over the past week. I realised that I really must wear a cap for every run whilst in this state for a couple of reasons:
a) Sunburn prevention
b) My head gets too cold
If those two concerns don’t convince you that I’m Ironman material, then nothing ever will…

Saturday – 3:00 Cycle (Z2)
Nothing too interesting to report. Handlebars got a little loose and started to droop forward/down near the end of the ride which made things interesting/extremely dangerous.

Sunday – 1:30 Run (Z1 – Z2)
This was my longest week of work, hours-wise so far. I’m feeling great and the ratio/breakdown of training days for each discipline and the Monday rest days in my training plan seem perfect at the moment. Definitely need to do more stretching though. The coming week has 12 hours of training in
store and Monday will represent 31 weeks til game day.

If you have any suggestions or ideas to help raise awareness for sarcoma research and/or the work CRBF do, please shoot me a message on social media or via email (jack.racklyeft@gmail.com).

Please share this, or any information from my donation page below to anyone and everyone you can. I have no doubt that slowly but surely, we will start to raise awareness and to make a truly positive change:

https://donorbox.org/jack-s-ironman-for-sarcoma

Week One

As a method of better engaging with all those interested in my Ironman and fundraising journey throughout the year, I’ll be looking to whip up a weekly recap of the week that has been. Depending on feedback I receive back from my loyal followers (i.e. just my mum, potentially my girlfriend…) I’ll add more, shorten, or change the content I’m putting out.

Monday – REST

So far so good

Tuesday – 1:00 Swim, 1:00 Run (Z2)

For future reference, whenever I’m mentioning Z’s (Z1, Z2, Z3 or Z4) it’s in reference to my heart rate for the activity, with Z1 being a light workout and Z4 being unsustainable for more than 5-10 minutes. Given my lack of cardio ability in these early stages, the general gist for my workouts is to build my base aerobic capacity, which means staying in this Z1-Z2 zone.

Wednesday – 0:45 Bike into 0:15 Run (Z2)

These kinds of sessions start to build my tolerance during the final transition of the Ironman. The general consensus I’m getting about Ironman’s is that this transition from the 6.5hr cycle into the marathon run is the most difficult part of the race so it will understandably make up a lot of my sessions over these 30 or so weeks

Thursday – 1:00 Bike (100rpm+) (Z1)

Currently the most boring sessions I’m doing, mainly because I’m stuck on the indoor bike at the moment watching tedious amounts of classic English Premier League matches (Newcastle vs Arsenal 2010/11 was a ripper game to be fair…)

I also met with Tania Rice-Brading (co-founder of CRBF) for the first time. It was incredible to get a sense of her story and the trials and tribulations that her and her family have had to go through as a result of sarcoma. I’ve never met anyone who has truly made me feel so welcome and comfortable so quickly and I can’t wait to learn more about the foundation and its plans going forward!

Friday – 1:00 Run (Z2)

Knowing I had to leave at 6am to drive to Albury (6hrs) for the Easter Weekend, this run started at 4:30am. This run sucked.

Saturday – 1:00 Run (Z2)

Suspecting a potential sesh that evening, I tried to achieve a significant calorie deficit to make myself feel better about what was about to come. Ultimately, I was unsuccessful

Sunday – Not Alive (Z0)

Hungover, no movement detected…

 

This week’s work was solid, despite the disruption from the Easter Long Weekend. Missing out on the key long cycle on Sunday was the only major disruption. Next week has 11 hours of training in store and Monday will represent 32 weeks til game day.

As I will continue to ask during the coming weeks, if you have any suggestions or ideas to help raise awareness for sarcoma research and/or the work CRBF do, please shoot me a message on social media or via email (jack.racklyeft@gmail.com). Please share this, or any information from my donation page below to anyone and everyone you can. I have no doubt that slowly but surely, we will start to raise awareness and to make a truly positive change.

https://donorbox.org/jack-s-ironman-for-sarcoma

The English Channel Swim launches…

Matthew & Chris Watson with friend Sam Gilbert

The Watson family are impressive by any standards.  Professor John Watson is an eminent Sydney Neurologist, Senior Vice Dean of the UNSW Medical Faculty, and a former Rhodes Scholar, who now is the Deputy National Secretary for the Rhodes Scholarships in Australia.  His wife Julieanne is not only a very busy mother of four, but she holds an array of impressive qualifications which sees her professional life working with the Australiana Fund, preserving and acquiring a permanent collection of Australian artworks, which furnishes the official residences occupied by the Governor General and Prime Minister of Australia. When they are not devoting time to their four sons, and their respective careers, they are helping others in a multitude of ways.  Their reputation for giving is well recognised amongst those who know them well.

Family is everything to John and Julieanne, and it is hardly surprising this power couple have produced four boys who are carbon copies of their parents.  Matt 29, Chris 26, Tim 22 and Peter 16, are each already making their mark on the world, and they too have been taught the value of hard work, giving back, and being the best version of yourself.

Our family has known the Watsons for over a decade, due to friendships formed between our sons at Sydney Grammar School.  Our eldest son Mitch, and Tim Watson have been the closest of friends for many years. When Cooper was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, the family were the first to offer anything and everything to make life easier for him, and for us.  Put simply, they are the friends you need to have when your world is crumbling around you.

In 2016, Chris Watson offered to tutor Coop for HSC, whilst in hospital.  He was in Year Eleven and the rigours of chemotherapy made study very difficult.  Chris was instrumental in devising ways Coop could continue study, without overtaxing him, and allowing him to keep up with HSC commitments.  Nothing was ever any trouble to Chris. The sad reality was, Coop was in a state of decline, and study eventually took a back seat to survival.

In November of 2018, I was overseas and received a most unexpected text message from Chris, who is studying a Masters in Genetic Research, advising me of his intention to swim the English Channel, with brother Matt and their lovely friend Sam Gilbert.   The three young men, who are all working in, or studying medicine and science, had under their own volition, opted to undertake this gruelling swim, and direct funds raised from the swim, to the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health where Matt and Chris have helped as volunteers and participated in fly-in fly-out clinics to remote communities, and to our very own CRBF.  Not surprisingly the rest of the Watson family also volunteer with the Poche Centre, with Tim . We were totally humbled by the gesture.

By means of background…

Matt Watson is 28 and currently working as a Resident at the Fiona Stanley Hospital in Perth, and has a strong interest in Indigenous Health issues, having done fly-in fly-out clinics with the Poche centre.  Matt studied a Bachelor of Commerce, and then MB BS at USyd, and is marrying his wonderful fiancee Sofie next month.

Sam Gilbert, 27 is currently working for biomedical engineering company, developing products with the hope of helping spinal injury patients to regain more function than currently possible.  Sam studied a Bachelor of Engineering Honours (Biomedical) at USyd, and is also a wicked chef.

Chris Watson, 26 is currently doing an MPhil, doing research toward treating genetic diseases of the brain at the Children’s Hospital Westmead, and will complete his medical course, an MD at USyd in 2019.  Chris also studied a Bachelor of Science, with an Honours year and the University Medal in neuroscience.

On February 2nd this year, the English Channel Swim was officially launched at a superb event in the magnificent gardens of the Watson family home, complete with magnificent catering, and a superb jazz band with music provided by Will McInnes, Rob Christian, Sam Rochlin and Ben Daniel.  Over 100 guests gathered to lend their support to these outstanding young men, who are preparing for the gruelling swim in July.

The Channel is a swim of about 44 km that can vary wildly depending on tides and conditions. The boys expect to take around 13 hours non-stop, and are currently training 10-12 hours per week, on top of their gruelling work and study schedules.   Apart from the 16-degree water of the English Channel, other challenges include negotiating sewage, freight ships in one of the world’s busiest waterway, and stinging jellyfish.

We at CRBF sincerely thank Sam, Chris and Matt for their generosity of spirit, and their thoughtfulness, and we wish them a safe and healthy passage throughout their swim.

TO DONATE – PLEASE GO TO THE LINKS BELOW

https://crowdfunding.sydney.edu.au/project/13264  –

The Poche Centre for Indigenous Health at the University of Sydney was established and funded in 2008 by philanthropists Greg Poche AO, Kay Van Norton Poche and their friend Reg Richardson AM.

The Poche Indigenous Health Network was created in Australia to make the most of the efforts and resources of the individual Poche Centres for Indigenous Health and to focus on issues best dealt with at a national level.

The Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation link may be found be going to:

https://give.everydayhero.com/au/english-channel-swim-

The sarcoma awareness campaign finally launches


Press here to view full interview

https://www.9now.com.au/today/2019/clip-cjrsgj2hy00000gmpt4vndnxv

Wednesday 6 February saw the launch of the CRBF national sarcoma awareness video on the Nine Network, Today Extra.

The interview was superbly crafted, with Coop’s dear friends Michael ‘Wippa’ Wipfli and Peter Overton leading the segment with their in depth knowledge on the plight of sarcoma patients, and the cancer itself.  Peter and Wippa were faultless in their delivery, and their humanisation of the story behind the Foundation.  At the core of what we do, are the faces of sarcoma, and they are the same faces that drive us to instigate change by providing funding and awareness for this cancer.  It is therefore critical we do not lose sight of those for whom we work.

Seasoned professionals, David Campbell and Richard Wilkins were flawless as hosts, and we thank them for the very respectful way the segment was navigated.  Sarcoma is an intensely serious topic, and can be a very tricky in an interview environment.  It proved to be no hurdle for either of these polished presenters.

Finally, we want to express our gratitude to the powerhouse duo behind the scenes, Today Extra producers, Liz Adam, and Blake Dale, who had thoroughly researched the segment, and directed the piece in such a respectful and factual manner.

This important initiative would not be possible without each of these outstanding individuals who shone the spotlight on sarcoma and the inherent issues faced by patients, clinicians, families and loved ones.

Once more we find ourselves searching for words to express our gratitude to this fabulous foursome.

Meet our new Patient Ambassadors


Imogen Atkins

After going through 8 months of chemo, and a 5 hour life and limb saving surgery it is amazing to be able to be back doing more normal things.  I still face regular check ups, and have only recently finished tougher rehabilitation, but in no way have, or will I, let that stop me from trying to do and achieve what I really want.

Let’s start with school and Uni. I successfully completed my final year of school with a highly sought after OP 8, despite many people suggesting I, a) repeat year 11, and b) to go down the path of getting a Rank instead. This year I am starting my Bachelor of Wildlife Science and hope to end up in conservation work. I have experienced a lot of times when I really had to push for what I wanted, and I’ve learned that if I know I can achieve something, I should push and achieve it.

Prior to the cancer, I was a very avid rower.  It was truly heartbreaking and difficult when I was told I might not be able to row again, but being the persistent and slightly stubborn person I am, I refused to take that as a never.  As soon as I was able to, I worked at regaining my strength and bend in my knee.  So, in my final year of school I once again competed in the BSRA competition as part of a crew who came first at the Head of the River Regatta. But it is honestly just amazing to be back on the water.  Despite the cold mornings of training, being on the water is one of the most important things to me, and brings me so much joy.

I have also found out that I like having a voice.  I am now part of the Queensland Youth Cancer Advisory Group.  In this group I, and several others, advise Queensland Youth Cancer Service on health service planning, delivery, evaluation education and training, together with developing spaces and facilities for young patients and their families.  We talk and discuss with people who are looking to improve their services.  I am basically a voice trying to make another young person’s cancer journey or experience, just that little bit better, and a little bit easier.  I feel this is really good and important.

After my cancer experience, I realised that I have to step into life, find ways of doing things, and never give up on my dreams.  I can no longer ski, so I learnt and continue to learn how to snowboard, and even when on my Year 12 Snowy trip in September 2018. 

I have done a range of things both in my normal life and my cancer life. Normal: I travelled to London and Finland with my family, I was a Bridesmaid at my sister’s wedding, and I became a Volunteer at Australia Zoo. Cancer: I presented at and sat on a panel of people at a Medical Conference. I have attended Bissy4Ward and Warf4Ward hosted Sony You Can Foundation.

But I’ve also lost two friends to Sarcoma and everyday I’m concerned I’ll loss another so in my life of remission I fight not just for myself but for them. I hope to be in that too small percent that survive so that I can live not just for myself but for them.

That is why I am now an Ambassador of the CRBF and hope that I can help find a way and be voice to make those percentages bigger.

Charlii Croese

 

I was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in my left femur on 29th of February 2016 I was 16 years old. For two months, I was missed diagnosed, I was firstly told I had a torn hamstring then I was told I had torn my ACL. Finally, after two months of horrific pain I finally received the scans we had been asking for. I was walking on a completely broken femur for two months and not even realising.

Being told you have cancer at the age of 16 is an absolute nightmare sitting in the doctor’s room and to hear those words shattered my heart into a million pieces my world was taken from me within a blink of an eye. At the age of 16 you’re just going into year 11 working out if you want to go to university and what you want to do for the rest of your life. Well not for kids like cooper and I for us it was being in a room with chemotherapy running feeling sick struggling to keep any food or drink down barely being able to have a shower and go to the toilets on certain days.

Crying in your bed just wishing for the pain and sickness you feel in your stomach for days on end to just go away. And on your good days spending it in your bed just watching television and enjoying not staring at those same 4 walls in your hospital room and having the company of your family and pets around.

Throughout my journey I struggled with seeing everyone around me move on with their life and mine just stood still. I wasn’t normal compared to all my friends. I lost many other cancer patients that I met throughout my journey and I felt so guilty to still be here without them. They became my family we understood what each other were going through. Many of my friends couldn’t deal with me being sick so they stopped speaking to me and would ignore me. I never held a grudge everyone deals with an illness in different ways. 

I just started to focus on myself and my health. My health was the most important thing while going through treatment. My family and my best friend were my rock I have the most amazing positive support group I’m so blessed to have such an amazing group of people whom support me.

Still ’til this day whenever I get any ache or pain in my body I always think the worst. Each day I always have a moment during the day that I think about my journey I still struggle everyday with what I’ve been through and how many people I’ve lost. Every day I just tell myself I’m a fighter and to be positive and take every day as it comes. Mum always said to me every day while I was battling cancer take it one day at a time and till this day it is exactly what I do.

Now two years in remission my life couldn’t be more amazing I just live each moment like it’s the last. The past 6 months we had some ups and downs my oncologist thought my cancer had come back and to hear it hadn’t was music to my ears I pray every day my cancer never comes back in the future. 

I’m completely over the moon, I’ve had the honour to become an ambassador of the Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation to be asked has made my heart so full I feel so privileged to be a part of such an amazing foundation there is nothing else I would rather do.

It’s time to raise awareness for Sarcoma we can do it together we can save someone else’s life and we will.

 

CRBF Sarcoma Awareness Campaign


The production of this awareness campaign has been a labour of love based on Cooper’s vision to ask the generous public figures and celebrities in his life, to join him in creating a national awareness programme for sarcoma.

The rationale behind this was simple.  He felt no-one would listen to a “pimply faced teenager with sarcoma”, but they may listen to this high profile collective, and in doing so lives could be saved.  Early diagnosis saves lives, and awareness of this cancer is paramount to improving survival outcomes.

Sadly Coop did not live to see what his friends have produced, however we know he would be humbled by the finished result, as the passion for cause is evident from all those involved.

We would like to extend heartfelt thanks to our celebrities in no particular order Peter Overton, Jessica Rowe, Michael ‘Wippa’ Wipfli, Mia Freedman, Peter FitzSimons, Callum Mills, Jimmy Barnes and Paul Roos, for helping us shine a light on sarcoma in our national awareness campaign.  

We extend a very warm thank you to our young sarcoma survivors, Imogen Atkins and Charlii Croese for the courage and bravery they have shown in participating in this campaign. We remain in awe of your resilience and determination.

Special thanks to Rudimental and songwriter John Newman, for allowing us to use’ Not Giving In’ as our soundtrack without fees, and to the amazing and ever dependable John Watson,  Founder, Eleven:  A Music Company, and manager to Jimmy Barnes, for facilitating the process.

Finally we thank our stellar and highly talented producers, James Tindale and Kristy Everett for their outstanding work, their patience and direction, together with the ever generous Michael Cordell for the loan of equipment, George Tyler for his creativity and guidance when filming our celebrities, and to Claire Bonic for her behind the scenes help throughout filming.

How do we begin to say thank you?…

Tuesday 22nd January, 2019  saw CRBF host the second T20 Birthday Bash at Trumper Park Oval, Paddington.  This event was incepted in 2018, by Coop’s friend and representative team mate, Will Todd.  Will, together with his family, mum Robin, dad James, and brother Tommy, worked so hard once again this year, to ensure the outstanding success of the event.  We are indebted to the Todd family for their ongoing commitment to this event, together with their love and support.

The oval was prepared to perfection for the event, and we would like to thank the Trumper Park Groundsman, Guy, who painstakingly prepared the wicket.  We were privileged to be the first hirers of the newly refurbished canteen, which withstood its first big test, with flying colours.  Our thanks are extended to Kim from Woollahra Council, for assisting us with the entire ground hire process, and the Council for waiving the ground hire fee.

A sell-out crowd once again witnessed a quality game where the CRBF All Stars were very unlucky not to take the bat home this year, going down narrowly to the CRBF 1st X1.

Man of the match was Will Simpson, with runners up, Cameron McLean, and Will Mallett.  We thank each of the thirty amazing young men for giving up their day, to participate in this very special event.

Below are the match reports from Mitch Rice-Brading and Will Todd.

-Mitchell Rice-Brading-

 The second annual CRBF T20 Bash, saw the CRBF 1st XI  looking to defend their title against the CRBF All Stars. After winning the toss and electing to bowl, the CRBF XI got off to flyer, especially Robin Evans, who was literally flying as he plucked a one handed screamer at square leg. Reeling at six for not many, after Will Mallett had run through the top order, Will Simpson entered the crease, and was kindly greeted by his whipping boy Steve Salakas. Simpson went about quickly rebuilding the innings, dispatching Salakas to all parts on his way to a finely constructed 80. As the tail rallied, the All Stars were able to put 172 on the board, a very competitive total considering their start.

The CRBF XI got off to a shaky start, losing Evans in the first over, but before long Isaac Crawford and Cameron Mclean were moving along beautifully at the crease. Quick singles and twos were few and far to come by, however this was masked by the destructive boundary hitting of both boys. After Crawford fell, Baxter Holt came to the crease and maintained the rage, including one remarkable switch hit which cleared the boundary by 30 metres. The contributions of these 3 boys saw the CRBF XI cruise to victory in the 17th over, and holding on to the bat for another year.

We know Coops is smiling down on us proudly as we honour his legacy in the most appropriate manner possible.

-Will Todd-

Winning the toss, the CRBF All Stars set out to score a big total. It was all the CRBF XI early with Will Mallett and Alec Sheldon tearing up the All Stars top order. Will Lawrence and Tom Miller looked eager to get the all stars back on track before they were both dismissed just shy of 20. Will Simpson proved to be the remedy for the All Stars, and simply too good for the CRBF XI, blasting an important 80 runs. Simpson cleared the rope all around the ground and with both hands! An extremely valuable 30 from Harry Crawford led the All Stars to a final total just shy of 180.

With a big total on the board Charlie Hooke wound back the clock with a fantastic opening spell, dismissing the dangerous Robin Evans in the first over. However, a huge first wicket partnership put the CRBF XI in the box seat. The All Stars fought back with two quick wickets providing some hope. However, a fiery 40 from Baxter Holt sealed the CRBF XI’s second victory in consecutive years.

The CRBF XI again proved to be too good for the All Stars.

As with the year prior, the day was another overwhelming success, and our family are truly touched by the generosity of all those who attended.  The  atmosphere in the stands was electric, and made for a fantastic vibe both on and off the ground.  On a day every year, that is an extremely difficult one for our  family, we are so humbled by the willingness of those attending, to make it a special day.

We could not conduct an event like this without our magnificent volunteers.  I could literally write all day and I would still be unable to adequately thank these remarkable individuals:

Kate Longden, Libby Patterson, Keith Cox, Tim, Gloria & Josh Gapes, Michael Furlong, Mitchell Rice-Brading, Emma Duncan and photographer Sorabh Arya who was also responsible for erecting marquees and everything in between,  all deserve a special mention for their staying power on a very hot day.  All starting between 11am and 12 midday and there until the end of the day.  Thank you really does not seem to cover our gratitude to each of you.

Joining these remarkable individuals were brothers Oscar and Hugo Patterson with a group of young friends who I am sure would have better things to do on a very hot day, but who worked so hard to prepare the exterior.  We thank them all so very much, together with our Chairman Robert Beech Jones, who put on an apron and worked for hours on the barbecue, producing some fine cooking in the process, Luke Bennett for set up, Chris Nicol, Michael Comino, Ani Joshi, and Toby Debelak in the bar, our umpires Martin Rossleigh and James Todd,  George Foley and Alexander Magiros who kept an close eye on everything around the ground, Josh & Alison Craig together with Gillian Sloane, who greeted our guests and stamped our over 18s, and Graham Nicol on barbecue.

We also extend our thanks to Kirsten Martenssen and Nikki Yeaman for their outstanding work in selling our raffle tickets, Lilah Critchley-Isherwood and Fiona Beith for their help with food prep, and Peter Salakas and Mitch Rice-Brading for a highly entertaining four-hour stint at the microphone.

An event such as this would not be possible without our commercial partners and sponsors.  We thank the following individuals and businesses for their generosity:

Mr Graham McDonald  & Cooper’s Brewery

Mr Mark Swadling – Pontoon, Darling Harbour

Ms Nikki Yeaman – Costume Box

Mr and Mrs D Mallett

Ms Kate Longden and the Roche family

The Royal Hotels  Group

Ms Louise Lorkin – Director, Albion Sports

Kim Solman – Woollahra Council

Woollahra Council

Easts Bulldogs Junior AFL

Easts Cricket Club

Brendan Hilferty – The Winepoint

Nguyen Bakery – Bondi Road

Clovelly Village Butchery

Ben Ralph & Dell Yates – All Size Miracles

Steph Hanna – Ties and Cuffs

Coles Supermarkets

Our final thanks goes to each of our supporters.  You purchased raffle tickets, tickets to the game, food and beverage, and proved to once again be the perfect group of spectators on the day.

More significantly to our family,  you once again wrapped your arms around our family on a day when we needed it most.

CRBF 1ST X1                                                 CRBF All Stars

Jack Gibson – CaptainWill Todd – Captain
Cam McLean- Vice CaptainFionn Geraghty  – Vice Captain
Robin EvansTom Chichester
Baxter HoltHarry Crawford
Sam IsherwoodJoe Bonic
Joe MackieMax Bonic
Will MallettCharlie Hooke
David RobinsonWill Lawrance
Stephen SalakasGus McGrath
Alec SheldonTom Miller
Marcus ShownirukXavier Roche
Will YeamanMax Patterson
 Tommy Scribner
 Will Simpson