City2Surf 2019

77 days from today, the Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation City to Surf team will once more spill onto William St, making their way onto New South Head Road, on the 14 km road to ‘Cure Sarcoma’.  

Join the team today and register before the 28th August, and receive $20 off the registration fee!

It is a two step process:

1. Register for the City2Surf 2019

Register for City2Surf 2019 at https://city2surf.com.au/

  • Join the TEAM “Coops Sprint for Sarcoma” as you register
  • Do NOT select a charity partner as you register for the event

2. Create a Fund-Raiser Page to Raise Funds for Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation

Go to https://city2surf2019.everydayhero.com/au/get-started

  1. Enter Your Page Title
  2. From the list of Charities select “Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation” – VERY IMPORTANT!!!
  3. Enter the remainder of details for the page
  4. Create Your Page
  5. Once page created select button on right to “Join an existing team”
  6. Search for Coops Sprint for Sarcoma
  7. Select “Join this Team”

Share your page with all friends and family through social media and email, and ask them to help us continue Cooper’s legacy to raise money for sarcoma research!

The English Channel Swim launches…

Matthew & Chris Watson with friend Sam Gilbert

The Watson family are impressive by any standards.  Professor John Watson is an eminent Sydney Neurologist, Senior Vice Dean of the UNSW Medical Faculty, and a former Rhodes Scholar, who now is the Deputy National Secretary for the Rhodes Scholarships in Australia.  His wife Julieanne is not only a very busy mother of four, but she holds an array of impressive qualifications which sees her professional life working with the Australiana Fund, preserving and acquiring a permanent collection of Australian artworks, which furnishes the official residences occupied by the Governor General and Prime Minister of Australia. When they are not devoting time to their four sons, and their respective careers, they are helping others in a multitude of ways.  Their reputation for giving is well recognised amongst those who know them well.

Family is everything to John and Julieanne, and it is hardly surprising this power couple have produced four boys who are carbon copies of their parents.  Matt 29, Chris 26, Tim 22 and Peter 16, are each already making their mark on the world, and they too have been taught the value of hard work, giving back, and being the best version of yourself.

Our family has known the Watsons for over a decade, due to friendships formed between our sons at Sydney Grammar School.  Our eldest son Mitch, and Tim Watson have been the closest of friends for many years. When Cooper was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, the family were the first to offer anything and everything to make life easier for him, and for us.  Put simply, they are the friends you need to have when your world is crumbling around you.

In 2016, Chris Watson offered to tutor Coop for HSC, whilst in hospital.  He was in Year Eleven and the rigours of chemotherapy made study very difficult.  Chris was instrumental in devising ways Coop could continue study, without overtaxing him, and allowing him to keep up with HSC commitments.  Nothing was ever any trouble to Chris. The sad reality was, Coop was in a state of decline, and study eventually took a back seat to survival.

In November of 2018, I was overseas and received a most unexpected text message from Chris, who is studying a Masters in Genetic Research, advising me of his intention to swim the English Channel, with brother Matt and their lovely friend Sam Gilbert.   The three young men, who are all working in, or studying medicine and science, had under their own volition, opted to undertake this gruelling swim, and direct funds raised from the swim, to the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health where Matt and Chris have helped as volunteers and participated in fly-in fly-out clinics to remote communities, and to our very own CRBF.  Not surprisingly the rest of the Watson family also volunteer with the Poche Centre, with Tim . We were totally humbled by the gesture.

By means of background…

Matt Watson is 28 and currently working as a Resident at the Fiona Stanley Hospital in Perth, and has a strong interest in Indigenous Health issues, having done fly-in fly-out clinics with the Poche centre.  Matt studied a Bachelor of Commerce, and then MB BS at USyd, and is marrying his wonderful fiancee Sofie next month.

Sam Gilbert, 27 is currently working for biomedical engineering company, developing products with the hope of helping spinal injury patients to regain more function than currently possible.  Sam studied a Bachelor of Engineering Honours (Biomedical) at USyd, and is also a wicked chef.

Chris Watson, 26 is currently doing an MPhil, doing research toward treating genetic diseases of the brain at the Children’s Hospital Westmead, and will complete his medical course, an MD at USyd in 2019.  Chris also studied a Bachelor of Science, with an Honours year and the University Medal in neuroscience.

On February 2nd this year, the English Channel Swim was officially launched at a superb event in the magnificent gardens of the Watson family home, complete with magnificent catering, and a superb jazz band with music provided by Will McInnes, Rob Christian, Sam Rochlin and Ben Daniel.  Over 100 guests gathered to lend their support to these outstanding young men, who are preparing for the gruelling swim in July.

The Channel is a swim of about 44 km that can vary wildly depending on tides and conditions. The boys expect to take around 13 hours non-stop, and are currently training 10-12 hours per week, on top of their gruelling work and study schedules.   Apart from the 16-degree water of the English Channel, other challenges include negotiating sewage, freight ships in one of the world’s busiest waterway, and stinging jellyfish.

We at CRBF sincerely thank Sam, Chris and Matt for their generosity of spirit, and their thoughtfulness, and we wish them a safe and healthy passage throughout their swim.

TO DONATE – PLEASE GO TO THE LINKS BELOW

https://crowdfunding.sydney.edu.au/project/13264  –

The Poche Centre for Indigenous Health at the University of Sydney was established and funded in 2008 by philanthropists Greg Poche AO, Kay Van Norton Poche and their friend Reg Richardson AM.

The Poche Indigenous Health Network was created in Australia to make the most of the efforts and resources of the individual Poche Centres for Indigenous Health and to focus on issues best dealt with at a national level.

The Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation link may be found be going to:

https://give.everydayhero.com/au/english-channel-swim-

The sarcoma awareness campaign finally launches


Press here to view full interview

https://www.9now.com.au/today/2019/clip-cjrsgj2hy00000gmpt4vndnxv

Wednesday 6 February saw the launch of the CRBF national sarcoma awareness video on the Nine Network, Today Extra.

The interview was superbly crafted, with Coop’s dear friends Michael ‘Wippa’ Wipfli and Peter Overton leading the segment with their in depth knowledge on the plight of sarcoma patients, and the cancer itself.  Peter and Wippa were faultless in their delivery, and their humanisation of the story behind the Foundation.  At the core of what we do, are the faces of sarcoma, and they are the same faces that drive us to instigate change by providing funding and awareness for this cancer.  It is therefore critical we do not lose sight of those for whom we work.

Seasoned professionals, David Campbell and Richard Wilkins were flawless as hosts, and we thank them for the very respectful way the segment was navigated.  Sarcoma is an intensely serious topic, and can be a very tricky in an interview environment.  It proved to be no hurdle for either of these polished presenters.

Finally, we want to express our gratitude to the powerhouse duo behind the scenes, Today Extra producers, Liz Adam, and Blake Dale, who had thoroughly researched the segment, and directed the piece in such a respectful and factual manner.

This important initiative would not be possible without each of these outstanding individuals who shone the spotlight on sarcoma and the inherent issues faced by patients, clinicians, families and loved ones.

Once more we find ourselves searching for words to express our gratitude to this fabulous foursome.

Meet our new Patient Ambassadors


Imogen Atkins

After going through 8 months of chemo, and a 5 hour life and limb saving surgery it is amazing to be able to be back doing more normal things.  I still face regular check ups, and have only recently finished tougher rehabilitation, but in no way have, or will I, let that stop me from trying to do and achieve what I really want.

Let’s start with school and Uni. I successfully completed my final year of school with a highly sought after OP 8, despite many people suggesting I, a) repeat year 11, and b) to go down the path of getting a Rank instead. This year I am starting my Bachelor of Wildlife Science and hope to end up in conservation work. I have experienced a lot of times when I really had to push for what I wanted, and I’ve learned that if I know I can achieve something, I should push and achieve it.

Prior to the cancer, I was a very avid rower.  It was truly heartbreaking and difficult when I was told I might not be able to row again, but being the persistent and slightly stubborn person I am, I refused to take that as a never.  As soon as I was able to, I worked at regaining my strength and bend in my knee.  So, in my final year of school I once again competed in the BSRA competition as part of a crew who came first at the Head of the River Regatta. But it is honestly just amazing to be back on the water.  Despite the cold mornings of training, being on the water is one of the most important things to me, and brings me so much joy.

I have also found out that I like having a voice.  I am now part of the Queensland Youth Cancer Advisory Group.  In this group I, and several others, advise Queensland Youth Cancer Service on health service planning, delivery, evaluation education and training, together with developing spaces and facilities for young patients and their families.  We talk and discuss with people who are looking to improve their services.  I am basically a voice trying to make another young person’s cancer journey or experience, just that little bit better, and a little bit easier.  I feel this is really good and important.

After my cancer experience, I realised that I have to step into life, find ways of doing things, and never give up on my dreams.  I can no longer ski, so I learnt and continue to learn how to snowboard, and even when on my Year 12 Snowy trip in September 2018. 

I have done a range of things both in my normal life and my cancer life. Normal: I travelled to London and Finland with my family, I was a Bridesmaid at my sister’s wedding, and I became a Volunteer at Australia Zoo. Cancer: I presented at and sat on a panel of people at a Medical Conference. I have attended Bissy4Ward and Warf4Ward hosted Sony You Can Foundation.

But I’ve also lost two friends to Sarcoma and everyday I’m concerned I’ll loss another so in my life of remission I fight not just for myself but for them. I hope to be in that too small percent that survive so that I can live not just for myself but for them.

That is why I am now an Ambassador of the CRBF and hope that I can help find a way and be voice to make those percentages bigger.

Charlii Croese

 

I was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in my left femur on 29th of February 2016 I was 16 years old. For two months, I was missed diagnosed, I was firstly told I had a torn hamstring then I was told I had torn my ACL. Finally, after two months of horrific pain I finally received the scans we had been asking for. I was walking on a completely broken femur for two months and not even realising.

Being told you have cancer at the age of 16 is an absolute nightmare sitting in the doctor’s room and to hear those words shattered my heart into a million pieces my world was taken from me within a blink of an eye. At the age of 16 you’re just going into year 11 working out if you want to go to university and what you want to do for the rest of your life. Well not for kids like cooper and I for us it was being in a room with chemotherapy running feeling sick struggling to keep any food or drink down barely being able to have a shower and go to the toilets on certain days.

Crying in your bed just wishing for the pain and sickness you feel in your stomach for days on end to just go away. And on your good days spending it in your bed just watching television and enjoying not staring at those same 4 walls in your hospital room and having the company of your family and pets around.

Throughout my journey I struggled with seeing everyone around me move on with their life and mine just stood still. I wasn’t normal compared to all my friends. I lost many other cancer patients that I met throughout my journey and I felt so guilty to still be here without them. They became my family we understood what each other were going through. Many of my friends couldn’t deal with me being sick so they stopped speaking to me and would ignore me. I never held a grudge everyone deals with an illness in different ways. 

I just started to focus on myself and my health. My health was the most important thing while going through treatment. My family and my best friend were my rock I have the most amazing positive support group I’m so blessed to have such an amazing group of people whom support me.

Still ’til this day whenever I get any ache or pain in my body I always think the worst. Each day I always have a moment during the day that I think about my journey I still struggle everyday with what I’ve been through and how many people I’ve lost. Every day I just tell myself I’m a fighter and to be positive and take every day as it comes. Mum always said to me every day while I was battling cancer take it one day at a time and till this day it is exactly what I do.

Now two years in remission my life couldn’t be more amazing I just live each moment like it’s the last. The past 6 months we had some ups and downs my oncologist thought my cancer had come back and to hear it hadn’t was music to my ears I pray every day my cancer never comes back in the future. 

I’m completely over the moon, I’ve had the honour to become an ambassador of the Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation to be asked has made my heart so full I feel so privileged to be a part of such an amazing foundation there is nothing else I would rather do.

It’s time to raise awareness for Sarcoma we can do it together we can save someone else’s life and we will.

 

CRBF Sarcoma Awareness Campaign


The production of this awareness campaign has been a labour of love based on Cooper’s vision to ask the generous public figures and celebrities in his life, to join him in creating a national awareness programme for sarcoma.

The rationale behind this was simple.  He felt no-one would listen to a “pimply faced teenager with sarcoma”, but they may listen to this high profile collective, and in doing so lives could be saved.  Early diagnosis saves lives, and awareness of this cancer is paramount to improving survival outcomes.

Sadly Coop did not live to see what his friends have produced, however we know he would be humbled by the finished result, as the passion for cause is evident from all those involved.

We would like to extend heartfelt thanks to our celebrities in no particular order Peter Overton, Jessica Rowe, Michael ‘Wippa’ Wipfli, Mia Freedman, Peter FitzSimons, Callum Mills, Jimmy Barnes and Paul Roos, for helping us shine a light on sarcoma in our national awareness campaign.  

We extend a very warm thank you to our young sarcoma survivors, Imogen Atkins and Charlii Croese for the courage and bravery they have shown in participating in this campaign. We remain in awe of your resilience and determination.

Special thanks to Rudimental and songwriter John Newman, for allowing us to use’ Not Giving In’ as our soundtrack without fees, and to the amazing and ever dependable John Watson,  Founder, Eleven:  A Music Company, and manager to Jimmy Barnes, for facilitating the process.

Finally we thank our stellar and highly talented producers, James Tindale and Kristy Everett for their outstanding work, their patience and direction, together with the ever generous Michael Cordell for the loan of equipment, George Tyler for his creativity and guidance when filming our celebrities, and to Claire Bonic for her behind the scenes help throughout filming.

How do we begin to say thank you?…

Tuesday 22nd January, 2019  saw CRBF host the second T20 Birthday Bash at Trumper Park Oval, Paddington.  This event was incepted in 2018, by Coop’s friend and representative team mate, Will Todd.  Will, together with his family, mum Robin, dad James, and brother Tommy, worked so hard once again this year, to ensure the outstanding success of the event.  We are indebted to the Todd family for their ongoing commitment to this event, together with their love and support.

The oval was prepared to perfection for the event, and we would like to thank the Trumper Park Groundsman, Guy, who painstakingly prepared the wicket.  We were privileged to be the first hirers of the newly refurbished canteen, which withstood its first big test, with flying colours.  Our thanks are extended to Kim from Woollahra Council, for assisting us with the entire ground hire process, and the Council for waiving the ground hire fee.

A sell-out crowd once again witnessed a quality game where the CRBF All Stars were very unlucky not to take the bat home this year, going down narrowly to the CRBF 1st X1.

Man of the match was Will Simpson, with runners up, Cameron McLean, and Will Mallett.  We thank each of the thirty amazing young men for giving up their day, to participate in this very special event.

Below are the match reports from Mitch Rice-Brading and Will Todd.

-Mitchell Rice-Brading-

 The second annual CRBF T20 Bash, saw the CRBF 1st XI  looking to defend their title against the CRBF All Stars. After winning the toss and electing to bowl, the CRBF XI got off to flyer, especially Robin Evans, who was literally flying as he plucked a one handed screamer at square leg. Reeling at six for not many, after Will Mallett had run through the top order, Will Simpson entered the crease, and was kindly greeted by his whipping boy Steve Salakas. Simpson went about quickly rebuilding the innings, dispatching Salakas to all parts on his way to a finely constructed 80. As the tail rallied, the All Stars were able to put 172 on the board, a very competitive total considering their start.

The CRBF XI got off to a shaky start, losing Evans in the first over, but before long Isaac Crawford and Cameron Mclean were moving along beautifully at the crease. Quick singles and twos were few and far to come by, however this was masked by the destructive boundary hitting of both boys. After Crawford fell, Baxter Holt came to the crease and maintained the rage, including one remarkable switch hit which cleared the boundary by 30 metres. The contributions of these 3 boys saw the CRBF XI cruise to victory in the 17th over, and holding on to the bat for another year.

We know Coops is smiling down on us proudly as we honour his legacy in the most appropriate manner possible.

-Will Todd-

Winning the toss, the CRBF All Stars set out to score a big total. It was all the CRBF XI early with Will Mallett and Alec Sheldon tearing up the All Stars top order. Will Lawrence and Tom Miller looked eager to get the all stars back on track before they were both dismissed just shy of 20. Will Simpson proved to be the remedy for the All Stars, and simply too good for the CRBF XI, blasting an important 80 runs. Simpson cleared the rope all around the ground and with both hands! An extremely valuable 30 from Harry Crawford led the All Stars to a final total just shy of 180.

With a big total on the board Charlie Hooke wound back the clock with a fantastic opening spell, dismissing the dangerous Robin Evans in the first over. However, a huge first wicket partnership put the CRBF XI in the box seat. The All Stars fought back with two quick wickets providing some hope. However, a fiery 40 from Baxter Holt sealed the CRBF XI’s second victory in consecutive years.

The CRBF XI again proved to be too good for the All Stars.

As with the year prior, the day was another overwhelming success, and our family are truly touched by the generosity of all those who attended.  The  atmosphere in the stands was electric, and made for a fantastic vibe both on and off the ground.  On a day every year, that is an extremely difficult one for our  family, we are so humbled by the willingness of those attending, to make it a special day.

We could not conduct an event like this without our magnificent volunteers.  I could literally write all day and I would still be unable to adequately thank these remarkable individuals:

Kate Longden, Libby Patterson, Keith Cox, Tim, Gloria & Josh Gapes, Michael Furlong, Mitchell Rice-Brading, Emma Duncan and photographer Sorabh Arya who was also responsible for erecting marquees and everything in between,  all deserve a special mention for their staying power on a very hot day.  All starting between 11am and 12 midday and there until the end of the day.  Thank you really does not seem to cover our gratitude to each of you.

Joining these remarkable individuals were brothers Oscar and Hugo Patterson with a group of young friends who I am sure would have better things to do on a very hot day, but who worked so hard to prepare the exterior.  We thank them all so very much, together with our Chairman Robert Beech Jones, who put on an apron and worked for hours on the barbecue, producing some fine cooking in the process, Luke Bennett for set up, Chris Nicol, Michael Comino, Ani Joshi, and Toby Debelak in the bar, our umpires Martin Rossleigh and James Todd,  George Foley and Alexander Magiros who kept an close eye on everything around the ground, Josh & Alison Craig together with Gillian Sloane, who greeted our guests and stamped our over 18s, and Graham Nicol on barbecue.

We also extend our thanks to Kirsten Martenssen and Nikki Yeaman for their outstanding work in selling our raffle tickets, Lilah Critchley-Isherwood and Fiona Beith for their help with food prep, and Peter Salakas and Mitch Rice-Brading for a highly entertaining four-hour stint at the microphone.

An event such as this would not be possible without our commercial partners and sponsors.  We thank the following individuals and businesses for their generosity:

Mr Graham McDonald  & Cooper’s Brewery

Mr Mark Swadling – Pontoon, Darling Harbour

Ms Nikki Yeaman – Costume Box

Mr and Mrs D Mallett

Ms Kate Longden and the Roche family

The Royal Hotels  Group

Ms Louise Lorkin – Director, Albion Sports

Kim Solman – Woollahra Council

Woollahra Council

Easts Bulldogs Junior AFL

Easts Cricket Club

Brendan Hilferty – The Winepoint

Nguyen Bakery – Bondi Road

Clovelly Village Butchery

Ben Ralph & Dell Yates – All Size Miracles

Steph Hanna – Ties and Cuffs

Coles Supermarkets

Our final thanks goes to each of our supporters.  You purchased raffle tickets, tickets to the game, food and beverage, and proved to once again be the perfect group of spectators on the day.

More significantly to our family,  you once again wrapped your arms around our family on a day when we needed it most.

CRBF 1ST X1                                                 CRBF All Stars

Jack Gibson – CaptainWill Todd – Captain
Cam McLean- Vice CaptainFionn Geraghty  – Vice Captain
Robin EvansTom Chichester
Baxter HoltHarry Crawford
Sam IsherwoodJoe Bonic
Joe MackieMax Bonic
Will MallettCharlie Hooke
David RobinsonWill Lawrance
Stephen SalakasGus McGrath
Alec SheldonTom Miller
Marcus ShownirukXavier Roche
Will YeamanMax Patterson
 Tommy Scribner
 Will Simpson

2018 – It’s a wrap….


Hi everyone

We hope each of you had a lovely Festive Season, and the coming New Year is a healthy, happy and safe one for you and for your family.

With 22 January fast approaching, we want to remind you tickets are selling fast to the CRBF T20 Birthday Bash, with gates opening at 2 pm.  The tickets have remained at $20 per person which includes barbecue and entry.  Food and beverages will be on sale throughout in strict accordance with RSA guidelines.  All persons purchasing alcohol must be 18 years or over, and provide identification if required.

Entry is by pre purchased tickets.  Go to TryBooking

https://www.trybooking.com/book/event?eid=458934

Funds raised in 2018

CRBF directors and our Medical Advisory Board unanimously voted to reinvest the funds raised by our hosted events, together with the extreme generosity of our major individual donors. At present we are in a consultative phase with research specialists, and leaders in the field of sarcoma, to establish where this significant amount of funding should be directed.  As was Cooper’s vision, all funding will be directed to where it will have the most impetus – to positively change survival outcomes for sarcoma patients.

Farewell to our Chairman

When Jeremy Sutcliffe joined us as Chairman in 2018, we were aware his tenure would come to an end in 2019, due to his planned relocation to Europe for the year with his family.

Jeremy has provided a very strong start to our aims to positively change survival outcomes and treatment options for sarcoma patients.  Through his wealth of expertise in the boardroom, as both an ASX 100 company chairman and as a seasoned company director.  His strong passion for cause and personal experience with this cancer, has contributed to the

We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to Jeremy for his belief in the work we are undertaking, and for the personal and professional qualities he brought to the role of Chairman.

We wish Jeremy and Catherine a safe, happy and healthy time overseas, making wonderful memories with their family.

Welcome to our new Chairman

CRBF would like to extend a very warm welcome to Justice Robert Beech-Jones, who will succeed Jeremy Sutcliffe, as our Chairman, effective immediately.

Robert brings a wealth of diverse experience to the role with proven leadership ability, experience at Board level and more significantly, in the not for profit sector,  together with his very strong personal passion for cause, which is driven by his long association with Cooper through junior AFL.

To read more about Robert’s distinguished career, please visit our Board page at www.crbf.org.au.

Below an overview of CRBF’s first eleven months as a registered Australian charity, to provide you with a summary of what we have achieved to date, and our direction heading into 2019: 

ACNC Registration

On Cooper’s birthday, January 22, 2018, our application for ACNC registration, and DGR status was approved, and the Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation became a registered Australian charity.  This was bittersweet, as it was Cooper’s long-held aim to gain independence as a charitable entity, and was therefore tinged with immense sadness when he was unable to see it come into fruition.

 Inaugural T20 Birthday Bash

Cooper’s long-time friend, and representative team mate, Will Todd, incepted the idea to host a cricket match on Cooper’s birthday, 2018, to pay homage to Cooper’s passion for cricket, and enabling the players, all from his days of school and representative cricket, commemorate the day while reliving memories from the past decade.

While the event was not designed as a fundraiser, sarcoma research benefitted from the  $5000 it generated on the day, with special thanks to the Todd family, the players and volunteers who gave up their day,  to Australian cricketer Nathan Lyon for his time and effort together with his manager, Peter Lovitt from the Drive Avenue Group, and to our partners, Costume Box, Coopers, Ties and Cuffs and Easts Cricket Club. The match was a huge success with the CRBF 1st X1 narrowly taking victory over the CRBF All Stars.   22 January, 2019 will see the second match played at Trumper Park.Oval, starting at 3 pm. A strictly limited number of tickets available at TryBooking – or by pressing the link below:

Mother’s Day Breakfast  

Hosted by the dynamic Mia Freedman, this event was held on Friday 11 May, 2018, at Zest Waterside Venues, RMYC Point Piper.  The breakfast was an outstanding success, raising in excess of $30,000 for clinical research for sarcoma.    Due to its popularity, the event will be conducted once again in 2019.  Our sincere thanks to major partners Glasshouse Fragrances, Dior, Zest Waterside Venues and Taylors Wines.

Robert Hao Piano Recital

Rob Hao very kindly dedicated his farewell performance to the Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation, prior to leaving to study an undergraduate Bachelor of Music, at the Royal College of Music in London.  Rob kept the audience spellbound with works from Chopin, Bach and Alban Berg, finishing with an early Beethoven sonata.  His immense talent and passion for music raised over $2000 to provide hope for young sarcoma patients, and we extend our heartfelt thanks to Rob for his kindness and generosity.

City To Surf

The Foundation’s first City to Surf proved to be highly successful both from an awareness and fundraising perspective.  Thanks to the efforts of radio hosts Fitzy and Wippa together with NOVA 96.9, our campaign reached a national audience, and the CRBF team raised $20,000 as a result.  The event also saw the release of our Stamp out Sarcoma merchandise, and caps, socks together with the “Run for Coops” t-shirts saw our team stand out for all the right reasons during the race.  Our thanks go to Fitzy and Wippa, Nova FM, and Upcycle studio for their part in ensuring the campaign was an enormous success, together with the generosity of our sponsors.

Autore Pearls – “The Cooper”

Autore Pearls are synonymous with quality, and exquisite design, with their designs worn by Angelina Jolie, Halle Berry, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Selena Gomez, to name but a few.

The Cooper has been designed by AUTORE Design Director, Jane Autore, to embody the spirit, and the life of our precious son, whilst generating funding for critical clinical research by donating 10% of each sale directly to CRBF.

This is a unisex piece, with a magnificent Italian leather plaited band, an exquisite South Sea pearl, customised clasp with the CRBF logo, and a small garnet detail to signify Coops love of cricket.  The bracelet is available in a double and single strand.

Our heartfelt gratitude to the Autore family, for creating this spectacular piece, and for their support of the work of CRBF.

SGS Trivia Evening

2017 saw the inaugural Sydney Grammar School trivia evening, with proceeds directed to CRBF.  This was incepted by Senior Housemaster Mr Jason Slater, and supported by the form v1 boys.   Sadly, Cooper was too unwell to attend, however was so very touched by the sentiment, as he would have been this year when the second trivia event was held, returning $1600 to clinical research into sarcoma.

Our sincere thanks to Mr Slater, together with Headmaster, Dr Richard Malpass, Masters and students for contributing to the success of this event.

Legends of League Chairman’s Dinner

The 11th September saw CRBF chairman, Jeremy Sutcliffe, host the Legends of League dinner, NRL Museum, NRL HQ.  The league legends including Braith Anasta, Brad Fittler, Steve Blocker Roach, Wayne Pearce, Daly Cherry-Evans, Anthony Minichiello, Steve Edge and Michael Ennis dined with invited guests and share highly entertaining stories of their illustrious playing careers.

The evening was a resounding success returning $37,000 for clinical research into sarcoma, and our heartfelt thanks goes to the NRL commission, Todd Greenberg, Peter Beattie, Rachel Kramer and the NRL staff, together with host Anthony Maroon, and partners for the event, Serena Sanderson Catering and Dianna Jaber, director of Take Me, designer tableware.

The Griffith region NSW community fundraiser – Tayla Zandona

Tayla Zandona is a remarkable young woman who knows the heartache of sarcoma first hand, losing her big brother Kyle to this cancer on Christmas Day, 2016.

Despite the grief that never subsides, Tayla staged simultaneous events in the Griffith/Yenda region, to raise in excess of $4000 in an effort to ensure no other family ever go through the heartache she and her family live with daily.  We will be working closely with Tayla this year in support of a very large event in this region.  Having lost five members of the local community to sarcoma, this region is very committed to assisting the funding of sarcoma research, and we look very forward to working with this extremely generous group of individuals over the coming months.

We extend our heartfelt thanks to Tayla for her generosity of spirit.  No-one can truly begin to understand the devastation of this cancer until you have witnessed a loved one fight so hard to conquer it – making her efforts truly inspiring.

Thank you

We would like to thank each of you, our donors, supporters, volunteers, directors and our executive committee members for the tireless work and support we have received throughout our first year as a registered charity.

Special thanks to the following donors for their outstanding support.

Saving the best until last…


Friends were so very important to Cooper. They were the very essence of who he was. This was never more evident than throughout his valiant battle with osteosarcoma.

Cooper was never comfortable with his friends seeing him unwell, he did not want to make them uneasy or scare them unnecessarily, so rarely did he allow them to join him at the hospital. Instead he would save their get togethers for when he was discharged, and they could have some fun together, without the stark reminders of that dark cloud that followed him throughout his illness.

Coops friends represented normalcy. They were his escape back in time when things were so much simpler, and they never let him down.

This group of friends who manifest from The Scots College, and Sydney Grammar School provided Cooper with a lifeline during the really difficult times. They were always up for a game of footy at the park or have a hit of cricket on the good days, and on the bad days, they would be the first to rally around him, whether that was a visit to do not very much at all but to let him know they cared, or something equally as simple as a Facebook message or SMS when he was confined to bed, which never failed to lift his spirits.

We never underestimate the pain these wonderful young men must feel on occasion, since Cooper is no longer in their lives, and yet each of them in their own way, has continued to support our family and the Foundation that bears Coops name, and we are so grateful to each of them for doing so. This road we travel is unchartered territory, and we must never take anything for granted, so to maintain contact with each of these young men who were so important to Coop, is more than we could have ever hoped for.

We are so very proud to announce these outstanding young men as Ambassadors for the Cooper Rice-Brading Foundation, and can only imagine how proud Cooper would have been of this very important and significant development.

To Gus, Warwick, Joe, Max, Xavier, George, Alexander, Matthew, Adam, Lachie and Sam -words cannot express our gratitude to each of you for the wonderful memories you provided Coop and our family over the years, and the joy you brought to his very brief life.

We are honoured to have each of you join the Foundation to play such an important role in ensuring Cooper’s legacy lives on.

Max Bonic


When I moved to Sydney for the start of year 6, Cooper, also new to the school, was a massive influence in making that transition seamless. It was Cooper and his family who took my brother and me to watch an AFL game for the first time, a sport I had never seen before and it was Cooper who later encouraged me to give the sport a try for myself. It was from these foundations that our friendship was built.

Learning about Cooper’s diagnosis was obviously a shock and a very sad moment, but it wasn’t something I understood the realities of very well. My initial mindset was always one of optimism, that this would be a great challenge but one Cooper would come away from. I think this was largely the attitude Cooper adopted as well. One of the things I most admired about Cooper was his resilience and refusal to ever complain. He much preferred to keep himself busy and enjoy spending time with his mates than feel sorry for himself, which is something that definitely rubbed off on the people close to him.

When Tania asked if I would be interested in being an ambassador for the foundation, it was an easy decision. The work that the foundation has done so far in raising awareness and funding research into Sarcoma is astonishing. Cooper gave me so much through my friendship with him, so I leapt at the chance to help in any way I could. I am immensely proud to represent to foundation and I hope we can continue the great work that has already been done.

Max Bonic

Joe Bonic


As the only other new student in my class when I first moved to Australia as a 10 year-old, Cooper was the first friend I made. This friendship was hardened on the sporting field, a place where Cooper, myself, and all our friends were happiest. This never changed, and, as it was when we started high school, we neared the finish by spending our time throwing the footy around at the park.

Cooper was persistent during our last year together. Even when the treatment and the cancer did their worst to his body, his sense of humour and his spirit were as strong as ever. No matter how low I’m sure he felt, he would never let on to his friends for fear that we would treat him any differently to how we always had.

I had never heard of Sarcoma when Cooper was diagnosed, and that’s a crying shame because I know that it means that so many others will also have never heard of it until it affects someone they love. That’s why the awareness and research that Cooper and the Foundation are helping is so important, and to support that in any way is a real honour. The work that Tania, Colin, Mitch and everyone involved in the Foundation has done is fantastic, and I can’t wait to see the wonderful work that can be done in the future.

Sam Isherwood

Sam Isherwood

Matt Jones

Matt Jones


I first met Cooper when he joined Scots and instantly became extremely good friends. We shared a passion for sport wether it was playing it, watching it or discussing it.

I played with and against Coops in multiple sports Cricket, Rugby and Aussie Rules to name a few, he was such an exceptional athlete which meant it was a lot better to play with him rather than against him. When ever I was around cooper I could guarantee that I could have an uncontrollable laughing fit, he was the funniest person I’ve ever met and that never changed.

When Cooper moved to grammar I was fearful that our friendship would grow distant but thankfully it never did. When Cooper got sick he never complained not once, he was so inspirational the whole way through and showed endless amounts of courage and perseverance. Coops really is a role model, he is an inspiration to me and I am sure to everyone around him.

I am very proud to be an Ambassador for Cooper because he was such a good person and a good friend.

Lachie Kiel

Lachie Kiel

Alexander Magiros

Alexander Magiros


Cooper was one of my closest mates at SGS. It feels like not long ago that we were messing about in our year 10 humanities class.
My fondest memory was kicking around an AFL ball on Birchgrove oval only to be pleasantly interrupted by Tania making sure that we had been well fed.
Throughout Coops’ first year of treatment, he lived as if nothing had changed. He remained the humorous,
enthusiastic and outgoing person that I know. Although he never spoke of his suffering or his Foundation, the work he had put into it was indescribable. His courage in the face of adversity is what was most inspiring.
I am proud to be an ambassador in honour of Cooper’s legacy which he worked so tirelessly to establish.
It is so important to educate our society of such a rare cancer as doctors at Lifehouse are seeing 3-4 new cases a week. I’m eager to help the Foundation progress in any way that I can.
Alexander Magiros

Gus McGrath

Gus McGrath


My mate Cooper has had a big influence on my life. I want to keep it this way, forever.

We played sport which we both loved, mainly cricket and footy, we laughed, we played Poker, and we had fun. Coop never left our Scots group and even in his years and time at Grammar we stayed best mates.

When Coop got sick he never complained.  At first, I didn’t understand what was happening and Coop didn’t want to explain it. I respected that.

My Dad had been sick with Leukaemia when I was young so I knew that Cancer would change things. It didn’t change Cooper. He wanted to be part of everything as it had always been. So we played cricket, we played footy, we played cards, and I sat with him in the hospital when he was having treatment or recovering from it.

Coop was so brave. I wanted to tell him all the time because he was trying so hard to be normal and I wanted to help him. Sometimes in the silent moments nothing needed to be said, only that I would stand by him whatever it took.

When Tania asked if I would be an Ambassador for Cooper, I didn’t really understand what that would mean or what I can add. However, if I can honour Coops courage, his determination, and represent him when asked, I would do my best. Coop is not a memory for me, he is here every day and always will be.

Gus McGrath, September 2018.

Adam Pacey

Adam Pacey


My relationship with Cooper began in our first year of school at Sydney Grammar. Sharing a liking of sport, our friendship soon blossomed in the coming years.

Our friendship was forged in our early years of high school which involved an endless pursuit of evading all school work and figuring out ways to avoid our next detention or homework submission.

But it was when he was presented with his life changing diagnosis that Cooper’s great character became even more apparent. A memory that I treasure was when Coops returned to cricket at Weigall against St Joseph’s College. After months of chemo and an intensive surgery, Cooper managed to train and play cricket at 1stXI standard. Cooper was unlike any person I’ve ever known. In the face of immense hardship, he always remained true to his character and maintained his sense of humour.

I am proud to be an ambassador for the Cooper Rice Brading Foundation, a cause that one of my best mates worked tirelessly to promote at the hardest point of his life, in the hope to save further lives.

Xavier Roche

Xavier Roche


My lasting memories of the friendship I shared with Cooper are of his unique sense of humour, our shared love of sport and competition and the courage he displayed throughout his illness. His personality and strength of character remain influential in my life and are never far from my thoughts.

The enduring impact of Cooper’s life on his friends remains immediately apparent in our Scots friendship group, through both consistent references to hilarious and unforgettable moments we had with Cooper and the decisions and actions each of us make, for which Cooper’s bravery and determination will always provide guidance.

In my 18 years I have known several family members and friends, in addition to Cooper, who have been diagnosed with cancer. Whilst the therapies they have undergone have often been brutal and challenging, thankfully with research and funding there are increasingly successful treatment protocols for many cancers and I have been able to see these family members and friends recover and thrive.

At the time of Cooper’s diagnosis I assumed that this would be the case for him too. I did not realise the aggressive nature of Sarcoma, nor the limited options for successful treatment and survival.

It is with this in mind that I am eager to be involved with the Foundation to assist in any way I can with lobbying for funding and research into Sarcoma.

Xavier Roche

 

 

Warwick Ward

Warwick Ward


“My earliest memories of Cooper are from Year 6 at the Scot’s College. With a mutual passion for sport and an identical sense of humour, we were destined to become really good mates. Funnily enough, it wasn’t until he had left Scots and moved to Grammar that we became so close.

Cooper’s cancer diagnosis was a really confronting experience. One of my biggest concerns was whether Cooper would be able to continue playing sport because he loved it so much. However, Cooper didn’t let his condition stop him, he continued to persevere, insisting he was the best sportsman despite playing one handed. Cooper’s sporting efforts are a testament to his perseverance and resilience.

Cooper rarely discussed his cancer because he didn’t want it to impact those around him. He was so brave and selfless, a true role model. No matter how tough things seemed to be I always believed he was going to be okay because he was so positive and motivated.

I am very proud to be an Ambassador for Cooper because I want others to be inspired by his perseverance and courage, just like I am. While I’m not too sure what being an ambassador entails, I feel very safe in Tania’s hands.”

George Foley

George Foley


My friendship with Cooper was one of real mateship.

Sharing a love for sport, we would waste hours endlessly arguing over things like whether Buddy was a good signing for the swans, is Smith or Slater better in their prime, and where the Aussie cricket teams inconsistency comes from.

A natural connection came and we clicked from the early years of high school. Always laughing and smiling, our friendship meant more to myself than Cooper ever knew.

Getting involved with CRBF seemed a no brainer to me once Coops told me about it. I’ve been lucky enough to be involved with the foundation, beginning with the year 12 trivia night fundraiser in early 2017.

I look forward to continuing my ongoing support of the CRBF and becoming more involved in the Foundation’s fantastic efforts to beat Sarcoma as an ambassador.

A tribute to Kyle Zandona in the words of his sister Tayla


When Cooper passed away, I opened my email shortly after to find a heart-wrenching email from the younger sister of a patient who had lost his valiant battle with sarcoma. Her name was Tayla Zandona, and her words resonated with me deeply, and could have only come from someone who had lived the unspeakable devastation of sarcoma.

Tayla had lost her much- loved older brother Kyle to sarcoma at the age of 25, at a time when he had his whole life ahead of him. Every day she relives that pain, yet this extraordinary young woman still found the capacity to reach out to our family and to register her support.

Fast forward to a month ago, when Tayla and her equally lovely partner Damon came to visit us in Sydney, and it felt like we had known each other for longer. Certainly for my husband and I, there was an instant bond. The friendship was formed through the commonality of sarcoma, and yet I felt there was so much more – strong family values, a country upbringing, and the determination to succeed no matter what, which I saw so much of in Cooper.

I was delighted and somewhat surprised when I realised some weeks later, this remarkable young lady, was intent on fundraising for CRBF. This was never expected, and a very big part of me felt considerably uncomfortable with the notion, as I did not want our friendship to be based on what Tayla should or could do for the Foundation.

Nevertheless, she forged on and literally weeks after we met, on Saturday December 1, she and her amazing cohort of friends, contacts, and supporters in the Griffith region, raised $4300 for clinical research into sarcoma. This was done by a joint initiative between F45 Training in Griffith, and their trainer Andy Gamble, and the Yenda Diggers who hosted a summer session barbecue lunch with Hidden Temple providing the entertainment. Tayla also arranged a raffle, with all prizes generously donated by businesses in Griffith and Yenda.

Words really do elude me, when I am faced with an example of such pure generosity of spirit. Tayla could be forgiven for simply not wanting to look back, after what she has been through, and yet she is so driven to make a difference in the lives of sarcoma patients, by raising funds for clinical research.

I have not yet had the pleasure of meeting Tayla’s family, however judging by the wonderful young woman she is, one can only imagine, they must be extraordinary.

Tayla, words really cannot express our gratitude to you for our kindness, and thoughtfulness, especially given the hand of cards you have been dealt. It goes without saying – you set the bar very high for all of us.

Your precious brother Kyle would be justifiably proud of your courage and determination, and the difference you are making in the lives of young sarcoma patients everywhere.

Tayla’s deeply touching tribute to her brother Kyle, written in her own words, appears below.

Kyle’s story starts in August 2009, returning home a little sore from a weekend trip to the snow. For only a couple of tumbles while skiing the pain was not subsiding almost a week later. All of that was put on hold when we got the devastating news that Kyles best friend had passed away. He took it upon himself to look after everyone else thinking it was only a pulled muscle. Until Kyle could no longer hide the pain as he started limping and his thigh started to swell. It was then we decided it was not a normal muscle tear despite what one of the local doctors were saying and treating it as.

Four months later on the 16th December 2009, Kyle found himself sitting in Sydney doctor’s consulting room being told at the age of 18 years that he had a tumour the size of a deflated football growing on his right femur, Osteosarcoma.

His treatment began Christmas Eve 2009 three rounds of chemo, major leg surgery that followed in February 2010, doctors had planned to remove right femur, radiate it, then to return it back. Two days prior to surgery there was a change in plans as doctors had revealed that chemo had not worked as well as we all hoped. They then decided to replace 70 percent of his leg with a titanium prophesises (just below the hip to below the knee). After surgery another three rounds were planned until the second sent him into renal failure and he was left fighting for his life.

18 months later October 2012 a PET scan revealed our worst nightmare, it had returned in his left lung which doctors immediately removed, which lead to an extremely painful recovery, Agony with every breath he took. Five months later March 2013, another lung surgery as it has return again in his right lung this time. Three months later June 2013 with chemo to commence again in July an inpatient for three weeks straight.

August 2014 another lung surgery but this time the cancer had attached itself to two ribs which doctors had to remove and rebuild his diaphragm. April 2015 another surgery. June again for his 5th lung surgery another two ribs were taken and more diaphragm rebuilt. August 2016 it had returned again protruding and growing at a rapid pace. Doctors then tried chemo injections. October 2016 more chemo then returned home.

December 25th 2016 at the age of 25 Kyles seven year battle came to an end.

Even though osteosarcoma took up a large part of Kyle’s life, he never let it define him. As soon as you stepped off the hospital grounds you were forbidden to speak of it, “what happens in hospital stays in hospital”. He wouldn’t simply just walk out of hospital it would be a sprint even though doctors had said he “would never be able to run again”.

The man we remember was an old soul with a heart of gold, the definition of brave, courageous and selfless, a country boy. The only thing he wanted was to follow his father’s footsteps and take over the family farm. He showed this at the age of 18 months old, he would climb out of his cot, pull a chair to the door to unlock it, head out onto the farm at 3am in his little bananas in pyjamas gumboots, a nappy and a singlet ready to help with the harvest.
At the age of nine he was driving the tractors begging mum and dad to stay home from school so he could help as there wasn’t anything important happening at school. Two weeks after major leg surgery you would most likely find yourself resting and doing your exercises. Not Kyle, he somehow he had snuck out of the house for us to find him climbing up backwards into the tractor because he just wanted to go for a drive.

If you couldn’t find Kyle out on the farm you would find him with his mates creating “engineering master pieces” as he would say. Until dad got the phone call saying “your son built on council land again and he had to take it down”.

As he matured he started showing his love for the community. He was one of the youngest men to ever join rotary Australia, it was his way of thanking god at a second chance of life. He also got nominated for young Australian of the year and turned it down as there were others who deserved it more than himself.

He was able to live his dream of hiring a big RV and travel across the US not once but twice.
The infectious smile he wore all day when he ran out screaming he was going to godfather to a beautiful baby girl. That smile continued when he got the chance to humiliate his mate in front of everyone as it was his job to, being best man and all.

That smile will be forever be engraved in our hearts.

Like so many others, another life that
was cut short.

Kyle Zandona

27.10.1991 – 25.12.2016